Home » Tottenham announce pre-tax losses of £80.2-million for the financial year ending June 2021
Tottenham announce pre-tax losses of £80.2-million for the financial year ending June 2021
By Eddie Razo -

Teams are beginning to climb out of the coronavirus pandemic hole that forced clubs to play behind closed doors and without supporters. 

Despite playing these matches, clubs took a hit financially at the gates, and although Tottenham Hotspur plays in the Premier League, they were not exempt from financial losses. 

Tottenham announced pre-tax losses of £80.2-million for the financial year ending June 2021, with total debts increasing from £605m to £706-million. 

The north London-based club’s overall income was down to £361.9-million from £402.4-milliob. Despite Tottenham seeing an uptick in money generated from the television and media deals, up from £95.2-million to £184.4-million, their profit from operations fell to £97.1-million from £115.3-million.

“The financial results published for our year ended 30 June 2021 reflect the challenging period of the pandemic and the incredibly damaging timing of Covid-19 coinciding, as it did, with the opening of our stadium in April 2019,” Chairman Daniel Levy said in a statement. 

“With no less than three lockdowns, our operations were severely disrupted, albeit this was secondary to the impact everyone felt in their personal and family lives.”

Nonetheless, with supporters returning to stadiums and non-football events coming to Tottenham Hotspur Stadium, the club could be seeing some improvement revenue-wise. 

Also, the Premier League recently agreed to a £2 billion ($2.7 billion) six-year deal with NBC in the United States, so Tottenham will be grabbing a slice of that financial pie. 

On the pitch, Tottenham can help their financial cause by finishing in the top for and qualifying for the Champions League. 

Tags covid-19 daniel levy NewsNow Tottenham Hotspur
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at large
at large
1 month ago

The figures are relatively meaningless. The debt will never be repaid, similar to the rest of the $300 trillion in debt the world is now saddled with. Debt service is virtually nothing with interest rates at 0, thanks to the central banking cartel money printing machine that buys all debt on verge of default. It wouldn’t shock me to find out that ENIC are mere money launderers in the guise of a property manager, since clearly they lack expertise in football. So nothing to see here…

Glory Costs Too Much
Glory Costs Too Much
1 month ago

Levy had it made a few seasons ago, he had a top, top manager who got us into the CL 4 seasons in a row despite very little backing, the money from the CL rolled in year in and year out, very little of it was re-spent on players. Levy sat on his laurels and with the mindset of a total idiot let it all fall away.
Yes the pandemic was debilitating, but to all clubs. Yes we have a large debt to service due due to Levy’s insane overspending binge on unnecessary bells and whistles at his shopping mall.
However if Poch had been supported and the squad constantly refreshed, then we would likely have continued in the CL places during this period which would have significantly lowered our losses. CL prize money combined with constant bonuses for all high level televised games of that league would have eaten into that loss tenfold when compared to ropey or conference league income.
Levy has committed financial suicide.

East Stand
East Stand
1 month ago

So basically we are no worse off than all the other big clubs as far as being affected by the pandemic, only that we have 700m of debt to service and they don’t.

I’m not sure I quite I’m understanding the figures here, if they’re meant to be based on stadium use as an income. So because the stadium was close to crowds we lost close to 100m? The stadium will generate almost 100m a year alone? That’s news to me… 🤔

Rhys Jaggar
Rhys Jaggar
1 month ago
Reply to  East Stand

The stadium will generate significantly more than £100m if events take place as well.

Arsenal were bringing in £100m in matchday revenue in 2006 at a 60,000 stadium. They brought in £10m a year from just 100 VIPs in Diamond Club, after all. Factor in 7,500 odd in Club Level paying £2500 – 5000 a year and you have another £25m straight away. Add on 50,000 regular punters paying £1000 a year and you have another £50m.

Add in all the food and beverage revenues, programme sales and you soon get up to £100m with a few concerts in the summer thrown in.

The exact details at THFC will be different, but the principle remains – expect close to 50% of your revenues from premium seats.

Steve 'Killer Cushion' Williams
Steve 'Killer Cushion' Williams
1 month ago
Reply to  Rhys Jaggar

Aye we don’t know the numbers yet but it’s a game changer. Significantly greater they will be. The 175million loan at the beginning of the pandemic for lost revenue was telling.. The place is geared to take peoples money.. I’ve seen fools on twitter laughing at the fact the pints are so speedy, but this means we sell more pints.. 5 pound a pop, they are a tenner on NFL nights.

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